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Friday, February 13

  1. page Lakeview Overview edited ... {TrashPile.jpg} According to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and Was…
    ...
    {TrashPile.jpg}
    According to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and Waste Management, as of right now the landfills property consists of 130 acres of land and the peak of the landfill is only 420 feet lower than the highest peak in Erie County. There are 120 waste management employees and about 15 of them work at the landfill itself. The landfill pays more than 72,000 dollars in property taxes annually. In 2007, Summit Township and Erie County governments received a total of 542,184 dollars in host fees for the landfill. There are also fees that the public pays in order for their garbage to be taken. These depend on many different factors such as if the waste is being picked up by a Waste Management truck, what kind of waste it is, and if it is going to the Erie landfill. (Goerie.com)
    ...
    isn’t enough.
    for more information visit the Waste Management website!

    (view changes)
    9:07 am
  2. page will nemo have a home after the expansion? edited Current Landfill {http://www.beran-env.com/images/lkvw1.jpg} Proposed Expansion {http://ww…

    Current Landfill
    {http://www.beran-env.com/images/lkvw1.jpg}
    Proposed Expansion
    {http://www.beran-env.com/images/lkvw2.jpg}

    Because the Erie Lakeview Landfill can only hold so much, researchers are trying to find a way to expand the landfill to make it last longer. According to the article Landfill Expansionby John Guerriero, the Department of Environmental Protection says that the landfill can only go 1,543 feet above sea level. Right now, it is at 1,480 feet (Landfill Expansion). The locals in Erie joke that the landfill is one of the highest points in the county. In fact, you can see the lake and even parts of Canada on a clear day from the top of the landfill- not that it would be the choicest location for sightseeing. The current size of the landfill that is used for trash is 130 acres and the proposed expansion is 90 acres. This land is located south of the current landfill. Because the space is currently the landfill’s property, Lakeview just needs to get the Department of Environmental Protection’s approval to use the property as a dumping space.
    Those who support the landfill expansion argue that it will be easy because the land is right next to the current landfill and is already a “hole in the ground.” I say this because Lakeview uses the dirt from its southern property to cover up the daily garbage disposal. The people who do not support the expansion are those who are worried about the harmful toxins and odors that come from landfills. A larger landfill will lead to more and more deadly wastes. The proposed expansion is a much longer and more complicated process than one might think. According to Keith Doverspike, Lakeview’s Waste Management engineer, there are currently “eight binders, each 5 inches thick, along with 45 engineering drawings” of official documents concerning the expansion (Landfill Expansion). The expansion’s proposed cost is 40 million dollars. Summit Township, the host community of the Lakeview Landfill, receives one dollar for each ton of trash contributing to the landfill. This causes a reverse affect regarding recycling efforts. Since the county knows that it gets money for each ton of trash, the members of the community in turn will not pay as much attention to recycling. The worst part about this is that many plastics are not being recycled which causes them to sit in the landfill forever because they do not biodegrade. Therefore, more space is needed in the landfill to accommodate the extra waste.
    (view changes)
    7:28 am
  3. page will nemo have a home after the expansion? edited {http://www.beran-env.com/images/lkvw1.jpg} Because the Erie Lakeview Landfill can only hold …

    {http://www.beran-env.com/images/lkvw1.jpg}

    Because the Erie Lakeview Landfill can only hold so much, researchers are trying to find a way to expand the landfill to make it last longer. According to the article Landfill Expansionby John Guerriero, the Department of Environmental Protection says that the landfill can only go 1,543 feet above sea level. Right now, it is at 1,480 feet (Landfill Expansion). The locals in Erie joke that the landfill is one of the highest points in the county. In fact, you can see the lake and even parts of Canada on a clear day from the top of the landfill- not that it would be the choicest location for sightseeing. The current size of the landfill that is used for trash is 130 acres and the proposed expansion is 90 acres. This land is located south of the current landfill. Because the space is currently the landfill’s property, Lakeview just needs to get the Department of Environmental Protection’s approval to use the property as a dumping space.
    Those who support the landfill expansion argue that it will be easy because the land is right next to the current landfill and is already a “hole in the ground.” I say this because Lakeview uses the dirt from its southern property to cover up the daily garbage disposal. The people who do not support the expansion are those who are worried about the harmful toxins and odors that come from landfills. A larger landfill will lead to more and more deadly wastes. The proposed expansion is a much longer and more complicated process than one might think. According to Keith Doverspike, Lakeview’s Waste Management engineer, there are currently “eight binders, each 5 inches thick, along with 45 engineering drawings” of official documents concerning the expansion (Landfill Expansion). The expansion’s proposed cost is 40 million dollars. Summit Township, the host community of the Lakeview Landfill, receives one dollar for each ton of trash contributing to the landfill. This causes a reverse affect regarding recycling efforts. Since the county knows that it gets money for each ton of trash, the members of the community in turn will not pay as much attention to recycling. The worst part about this is that many plastics are not being recycled which causes them to sit in the landfill forever because they do not biodegrade. Therefore, more space is needed in the landfill to accommodate the extra waste.
    (view changes)
    7:27 am

Thursday, February 12

  1. page Is Mercyhurst the Lord of the Landfill? edited ... While that may seem very high for one class, it’s not that far off from the norm. We surveyed …
    ...
    While that may seem very high for one class, it’s not that far off from the norm. We surveyed seven professors in the English Department here at Mercyhurst and all but one had over a thousand pages of assignments, the other had about nine hundred. We asked how many classes each professor taught a term, the average number of students in their classes, how many writing assignments they give, and the average number of pages for the assignments. The answers provided were rough estimates and did not include drafts or handouts the professors may have provided. However, we did get an idea of the minimum number of papers that are printed out in one term for the classes these professors teach.
    {paper_stack.gif}
    ...
    fourteen hundred.
    Now, that is presuming that none of the papers are recycled, we actually only had one professor talk about how he recycles. Dr. Gregory Brown replied to the survey and added, “As for the papers, I keep the drafts and only hand back a finished copy. I keep them, and when I have held them for a time I recycle them, so they don’t necessarily end up in the landfill, though one doesn’t know what happens later down the line.” Even though this is a step in the right direction, not everyone recycles like they should.

    (view changes)
    9:08 pm
  2. page Honey, I shrunk the landfill edited ... According the the green team website, Mercyhurst College is working to help maintain the healt…
    ...
    According the the green team website, Mercyhurst College is working to help maintain the health of the earth and protect its well being. They want to make the campus more environmentally friendly and sustainable for years to come. The changes that they have made are important and have made the campus itself greener. Recycling bins are placed in all dorms and most of the academic buildings. The club suggests that to help us as a whole, to conserve energy by turning off lights every time you leave a room, not leaving technology on at night and using naturally sunlight to light up rooms during the day. Most people have heard of these environmental tips but did you know that Mercyhurst has a 3-kilowatt solar panel that has reduced carbon emissions or that our campus has planted fifteen new trees back in the fall. The club has worked hard but has anyone really noticed. Students walk past and see the recycling bins everyday but honestly how many people really use them properly. Everyday tons of recyclables are thrown out in the regular trash that will soon end up in Erie’s landfill. Imagine all the paper we use for our own English, history, and science classes. Teacher’s can receive up to thousands of papers in a single term. Is this unnecessary and is there a better way to limit the amount of papers we use in the classroom?
    The green team has done a lot for our campus but what about the city of Erie. They have yet to promote the green idea within the city where we reside. There are tons of projects the green team could take on to make our city greener. The landfill for example would be a great story to follow and inform the Erie citizens of its workings. There is very little news coverage of articles on the topic or of its expansion plans.
    ...
    new process.
    {http://www.allianceforsustainability.org/afs_files/images/icons_logos/green_team_network_-_logo.jpg}

    (view changes)
    8:32 pm
  3. page Lakeview Overview edited The Lakeview Landfill is Erie County’s only landfill. It is located at 851 Robison Rd East, righ…

    The Lakeview Landfill is Erie County’s only landfill. It is located at 851 Robison Rd East, right next to the recently built Presque Isle Downs and Casino and is run by the national company, Waste Management. Employees of the casino actually joke and call the landfill, “The casino’s future ski resort” (qtd. in goerie.com). According to John Guerriro, a reporter for the Erie Times News, the Lakeview landfill is one of the highest peaks in all of Erie County. It stands 1,480 feet above sea level and is still rising as more and more trash comes in.
    {TrashPile.jpg}
    According to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and Waste Management, as of right now the landfills property consists of 130 acres of land and the peak of the landfill is only 420 feet lower than the highest peak in Erie County. There are 120 waste management employees and about 15 of them work at the landfill itself. The landfill pays more than 72,000 dollars in property taxes annually. In 2007, Summit Township and Erie County governments received a total of 542,184 dollars in host fees for the landfill. There are also fees that the public pays in order for their garbage to be taken. These depend on many different factors such as if the waste is being picked up by a Waste Management truck, what kind of waste it is, and if it is going to the Erie landfill. (Goerie.com)
    Facilities run by the Waste Management Corporation take pride in the fact that they are trying to go green. All of their facilities use methane gas from the landfills for power supply, their vehicles have been converted from diesel to natural gas, and they also use solid waste to generate power. This process reduces the waste in landfills by about 90 percent, which saves space and expands the life of the landfill. (wm.com) With all that we are wasting however, this just isn’t enough.

    (view changes)
    8:30 pm
  4. file TrashPile.jpg uploaded
    8:30 pm
  5. page Is Mercyhurst the Lord of the Landfill? edited We all know that a lot of paper is used in writing classes, after all everyone in this class has h…
    We all know that a lot of paper is used in writing classes, after all everyone in this class has had at least two during their time here at Mercyhurst. For this class alone, we have printed out over 1700 pages of work as a whole. I was even surprised by this, but those pages add up fast. Especially when there are 26 students in our class, we had three large papers, for each of them we had to print out three copies of the rough draft to be peer reviewed, they also had to have a bibliography and letter to the reader, and there were six smaller assignments on top of all of that.
    While that may seem very high for one class, it’s not that far off from the norm. We surveyed seven professors in the English Department here at Mercyhurst and all but one had over a thousand pages of assignments, the other had about nine hundred. We asked how many classes each professor taught a term, the average number of students in their classes, how many writing assignments they give, and the average number of pages for the assignments. The answers provided were rough estimates and did not include drafts or handouts the professors may have provided. However, we did get an idea of the minimum number of papers that are printed out in one term for the classes these professors teach.
    {paper_stack.gif}
    Using that information and the numbers we received from professors about how many papers they assigned and how many pages they are, we came up with a rough number of papers used. The average came out to be over fifteen hundred pieces of paper per professor in one term. When this is broken down into professors who teach three classes and those who teach two, we found something interesting. The average for professors who teach two classes is over eighteen hundred while the average for professors who teach three classes is only somewhere over fourteen hundred.

    (view changes)
    8:28 pm
  6. page Lakeview Overview edited We all know that a lot of paper is used in writing classes, after all everyone in this class has h…
    We all know that a lot of paper is used in writing classes, after all everyone in this class has had at least two during their time here at Mercyhurst. For this class alone, we have printed out over 1700 pages of work as a whole. I was even surprised by this, but those pages add up fast. Especially when there are 26 students in our class, we had three large papers, for each of them we had to print out three copies of the rough draft to be peer reviewed, they also had to have a bibliography and letter to the reader, and there were six smaller assignments on top of all of that.
    While that may seem very high for one class, it’s not that far off from the norm. We surveyed seven professors in the English Department here at Mercyhurst and all but one had over a thousand pages of assignments, the other had about nine hundred. We asked how many classes each professor taught a term, the average number of students in their classes, how many writing assignments they give, and the average number of pages for the assignments. The answers provided were rough estimates and did not include drafts or handouts the professors may have provided. However, we did get an idea of the minimum number of papers that are printed out in one term for the classes these professors teach.
    Using that information and the numbers we received from professors about how many papers they assigned and how many pages they are, we came up with a rough number of papers used. The average came out to be over fifteen hundred pieces of paper per professor in one term. When this is broken down into professors who teach three classes and those who teach two, we found something interesting. The average for professors who teach two classes is over eighteen hundred while the average for professors who teach three classes is only somewhere over fourteen hundred.

    (view changes)
    8:27 pm
  7. page home edited ... Mercyhurst: Ain't Nothing But A Landfill Many locals joke that the Lakeview landfill is one o…
    ...
    Mercyhurst: Ain't Nothing But A Landfill
    Many locals joke that the Lakeview landfill is one of the highest points in Erie. This landfill is considering a 90 acre expansion into its southern property. The landfill takes trash from many surrounding communities including Mercyhurst. We are specifically going to talk about how the Mercyhurst English Department adds to Lakeview. Because of how much waste we and the surrounding communities contribute to the landfill, we are forcing expansion in the next couple years in order to add to the landfill's life.
    {Wikispaces Project Final Draft.doc}
    {http://www.prezziesplus.co.uk/user/products/lg-heart-hand-warmer.jpg}
    (view changes)
    8:26 pm

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